Londongrip - founded by Patricia Morris in 2007 - is a wholly independent online venue, a cultural omnibus providing intelligent reviews of current shows and events, well-argued articles on the widest range of topics, an exhibition space for cross-media arts and an in-house poetry magazine with its own editor. All items are original, making their first appearance on the internet in this form.
Tilly Crumb in ‘It Will Be Over By Christmas’ – 5th September, The Melon House, Iver, Bucks.

Tilly Crumb in ‘It Will Be Over By Christmas’ – 5th September, The Melon House, Iver, Bucks.

Tilly Crumb telling the story of WW1 through the songs of the time.

London Grip New Poetry – Autumn 2014

London Grip New Poetry – Autumn 2014

* This issue of London Grip features new poems by: *Wendy French *Peter Kennedy *Teoti Jardine *Rob Yates *Jan Hutchison *Mohammed Kamran *Antony Johae *Nancy Mattson *Ian C Smith *Mary Franklin *Colin Bancroft *David Flynn *Christopher Mulrooney *F M Brown *Sarah Doyle *Allen Ashley *Robert Nisbet *Michael Thomas *Kerrin P Sharpe

London Grip Poetry Review – Pantling

London Grip Poetry Review – Pantling

Josh Ekroy takes a thoughtful look at a poetic military memoir by Nigel Pantling

Kaddish (Symphony No 3) by Leonard Bernstein, Usher Hall. Edinburgh Festival. Julia Pascal.

Kaddish (Symphony No 3) by Leonard Bernstein, Usher Hall. Edinburgh Festival. Julia Pascal.

  This evening’s programme was performed by the Royal Scottish Orchestra.  Samuel Barber’s lyrical Violin Concerto, with a stunning performance by Vadim Gluzman, was the prelude to an evening which was more of a war cry than a polished musical offering.

London Grip Poetry Review – Harvey

London Grip Poetry Review – Harvey

First & second opinions: John Harvey’s latest poetry collection is reviewed by Rosie Johnston AND by Norbert Hirschhorn

Sweet Mambo. Pina Bausch. Edinburgh Playhouse. Edinburgh Festival.

Sweet Mambo. Pina Bausch. Edinburgh Playhouse. Edinburgh Festival.

This piece was premièred in Wuppertal over six years ago but is a UK première in Edinburgh.  It is poignant that this was made just before Bausch’s sudden death on 30 June 2009.

Guys and Dolls (Chichester Festival Theatre) – review by Carole Woddis.

Guys and Dolls (Chichester Festival Theatre) – review by Carole Woddis.

  It’s hard to put your finger exactly on what makes Guys & Dolls such a classic, magical show.  Is it the characters – the gambling low lifers Damon Runyon conjured from the streets of New York in the 1920s?

London Grip Poetry Review – McNeill

London Grip Poetry Review – McNeill

D A Prince finds that Christine McNeill’s poetry demands – and repays – the reader’s full attention

A Street Car Named Desire – Young Vic – review by Carole Woddis.

A Street Car Named Desire – Young Vic – review by Carole Woddis.

  Celebrity casting has its merits.  But it has its drawbacks too.  The great bonus of Benedict Andrews’ visceral new staging with X-Factor’s Gillian Anderson is that although the spotlight inevitably falls on her – she is after all on stage for nearly the whole duration of the play’s three hours – this is par(…)

Perfection. Hungry People. C Nova. Julia Pascal.

Perfection. Hungry People. C Nova. Julia Pascal.

  Jung Han Kim’s monologue performed by Jon Castro in one room with only a wall as décor, is a stunning exploration of huge philosophical debates in a hugely ironic and theatrical manner.

Camille O’Sullivan. The Assembly Rooms. Julia Pascal.

Camille O’Sullivan. The Assembly Rooms. Julia Pascal.

  The French have a phrase for artistes like Camille.  Bête de scène.  It means a singer or performer who knows how to seduce her audience.

Metta. Spiegeltent. Edinburgh Festival. Julia Pascal.

Metta. Spiegeltent. Edinburgh Festival. Julia Pascal.

  Metta is a traditional Buddhist word that means loving kindness and friendliness towards all.  This new group led by Damian Helliwell promises to break new ground in contemporary Scottish music and the result is exciting.