Londongrip - founded by Patricia Morris in 2007 - is a wholly independent online venue, a cultural omnibus providing intelligent reviews of current shows and events, well-argued articles on the widest range of topics, an exhibition space for cross-media arts and an in-house poetry magazine with its own editor. All items are original, making their first appearance on the internet in this form.
Damn Yankees, Landor Theatre.  Review by Julia Pascal.

Damn Yankees, Landor Theatre. Review by Julia Pascal.

This show originally opened on Broadway in 1955 and is a modern Faustian pact where a middle aged baseball fanatic sells his soul to the devil for youth and the chance to beat the Yankees.

London Grip Poetry Review – Moore

London Grip Poetry Review – Moore

D A Prince examines some of  the subtleties that make Hubert Moore’s poetry so effective

The Marriage of Figaro, Directed by Fiona Shaw, ENO.  Review by Julia Pascal.

The Marriage of Figaro, Directed by Fiona Shaw, ENO.  Review by Julia Pascal.

Fiona Shaw’s first impulse was to give Mozart’s famous comic opera a comic slant. But she concedes that Beaumarchais’ original text, set before the French Revolution, had to stay in the eighteenth century.

The Infidel, Stratford Theatre Royal. Review by Julia Pascal.

The Infidel, Stratford Theatre Royal. Review by Julia Pascal.

This is a wickedly funny satire on ‘race’ and religion which appears to deliver stereotypes but, at it core, has a deeper interrogation of British society.

Taken at Midnight (Chichester, Minerva Studio Theatre) – review by Carole Woddis.

Taken at Midnight (Chichester, Minerva Studio Theatre) – review by Carole Woddis.

A few years ago, I remember watching a TV drama about Hitler that surprised me. It was the true story of Hans Litten, the brilliant young German lawyer who subpoenaed Hitler in 1931, cross-examined him in a trial of four Nazi stormtroopers and humiliated him.

Tilly Crumb in ‘It Will Be Over By Christmas’

Tilly Crumb in ‘It Will Be Over By Christmas’

The library committee of Stepney Borough Council have invited Ms Tilly Crumb, the maverick editor of the Stepney Chronicle to give a lecture about the First World War. Tilly is a cross between Germaine Greer, Janet Street Porter and Edith Piaf and the library committee are nervous that her lecture will be just a bit too radical for their taste.

Capten, art tha sleepin’ there below?

Capten, art tha sleepin’ there below?

Peter Giles re-tells a little-known story from the second world war…

Peer Gynt, Barbican. Review by Julia Pascal.

Peer Gynt, Barbican. Review by Julia Pascal.

Ibsen’s original text, which he never imagined being staged, is a wild poetic fantasy far removed from his naturalistic works. Irina Brook’s version is inspired by her days in New York during the 1980s when she was in love with the rock scene and Iggy Pop. It is a brave production which tries to take this impossible text on a new journey.

Drayton Arms, London – The Unquiet Grave of Garcia Lorca – review by Carole Woddis

Drayton Arms, London – The Unquiet Grave of Garcia Lorca – review by Carole Woddis

  Mysteries still abound about the death of Garcia Lorca, the Spanish playwright, theatre director and poet.  Assassinated in 1936 at the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, speculation continues as to the why and whereabouts of his death.

The Girl of the Golden West. Puccini. ENO. Review by Julia Pascal.

The Girl of the Golden West. Puccini. ENO. Review by Julia Pascal.

This is the most surprising of nineteenth century operas.  It’s a Western!  The work is based on David Belasco’s drama of the same name though Puccini’s original was in Italian and known as La Fanciulla del West with libretto by Guelfo Civinini and Carlo Zangarini.  Belasco’s 1905 stage play was a hit but the 1910(…)

London Grip Book Review – The X Tractor

London Grip Book Review – The X Tractor

Michael Bartholomew-Biggs believes that a soft underbelly of tenderness can be detected beneath the surface of Peter Spencer’s cheekily playful short stories.

“It’ll be over by Christmas” – a new musical about the First World War

“It’ll be over by Christmas” – a new musical about the First World War

  “It’ll be over by Christmas”, as we know, is the blackly humorous phrase that encapsulates all the miscalculations made about the First World War – and perhaps any war.  The show takes us through the history and heroism, the absurdity and tragedy of that period in Western history that marks us even today.